IPv6 in v24

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divB
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 02 Jul 2006
Posts: 35

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 16:57    Post subject: IPv6 in v24 Reply with quote
Hi,

As far as I know there is no IPv6 support in v24, isn't it?

Why? Is IPv6 for v24 planned?

divB
Sponsor
shaksbeer
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 07 Jun 2006
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2008 10:47    Post subject: Reply with quote
ipv6 is working for me in EKOs v.24 std TNG build 9774:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/dd-wrtv2/down.php?path=downloads%2Fothers%2Feko%2FV24_TNG%2Fsvn9774/

cheers!

_________________
WRT54G V2.2 - DD-WRT v24 RC-6 std
Buffalo WHR-G54S - DD-WRT v24 TNG 9774 std
crushedhat
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Jul 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Fair Oaks, CA, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 22:11    Post subject: Reply with quote
Since “working for me” can mean anything, I’m posting exactly what I needed to do to get IPv6 working for me. More detail about many of these steps can be found in the wiki and other docs.

I’m using Eko’s v24 TNG build 9856 on my Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 (4MB flash). I’m running this variant so that I’ll have some JFFS space for packages:

http://www.dd-wrt.com/dd-wrtv2/downloads/others/eko/V24_TNG/svn9856/dd-wrt.v24-9856_NEWD_nokaid_nohotspot_nostor.bin

I see that the IPv6 kernel module and the radvd daemon are in the build, and that the Administration/Management panel provides a few IPv6 options. I’ve set “IPv6” to “Enable”, although this doesn’t seem to load the IPv6 module. Also, I’ve set “Radvd enabled” to “Enable”, even though this doesn’t guarantee that radvd will start at the proper time, but it does create /tmp/radvd.conf from the entered config, which is useful.

I have a static IPv4 address, so I’ve configured DD-WRT to connect a tunnel to Hurricane Electric. In the Administration/Commands panel I’ve set the following Startup script (these aren’t my real addresses, but in the pattern of an HE tunnel):

1 insmod ipv6
2 insmod /jffs/lib/modules/2.4.34/ip6_tables.o
3 insmod /jffs/lib/modules/2.4.34/ip6table_filter.o
4 insmod /jffs/lib/modules/2.4.34/ip6t_multiport.o
5 ip tunnel add he-ipv6 mode sit remote 72.52.104.74 local 1.2.3.4 ttl 64
6 ip link set he-ipv6 up
7 ip addr add 2001:470:1f00:0::2/64 dev he-ipv6
8 ip route add ::/0 dev he-ipv6
9 ip addr add 2001:470:1f01:0:200:00ff:fe00:0000/64 dev br0
10 echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv6/conf/all/forwarding
11 radvd
  • Line 1 loads the critical IPv6 kernel module, followed by the IPv6 filter modules, discussed below.
  • Lines 5 and 6 configure the IPv4 tunnel between the appropriate server at HE and the local static IP address.
  • Line 7 sets the local IPv6 address on the small tunnel network supplied by HE.
  • Line 8 sets a default route to the tunnel for IPv6 traffic.
  • Line 9 sets the IPv6 address on the local LAN/WLAN bridge. This is based on the /64 prefix allocated by HE for the local net plus the MAC address of br0, encoded in the standard IPv6 way. This could instead be in a /64 subnet of a /48 allocated by HE.
  • Line 10 enables packet forwarding between IPv6 networks.
  • Line 11 guarantees that radvd is run after this configuration is complete. It seems that the radvd enabled by the GUI option starts in a different thread from the startup script, so that it exits immediately upon discovering IPv6 missing in the kernel or an incomplete config. The second run will simply exit, so there should be correct behavior (one running radvd) regardless of the race.
I’ve entered the following in “Radvd config” on the Administration/Management panel. The same network prefix is used as above on line 9:

Code:
interface br0 {
        AdvSendAdvert on;
        prefix 2001:470:1f01:0::/64
        {
                AdvOnLink on;
                AdvAutonomous on;
        };
};

One more important thing is necessary. In the “Firewall” section of Administration/Commands I’ve added this line, which allows incoming packets using the IPv6-over-IPv4 protocol to flow to my tunnel:

Code:
iptables -I INPUT 2 -p ipv6 -i vlan1 -j ACCEPT

These steps were sufficient to get DD-WRT routing IPv6 to my local net. Machines on the local net now autoconfigure using Stateless Address Autoconfiguration. However, this leaves IPv6 without a firewall, which is critical especially for Windows which listens to MSRPC (port 135) on IPv6. To configure an IPv6 firewall, I’ve installed the following packages to /jffs:

http://downloads.openwrt.org/kamikaze/7.09/brcm-2.4/packages/kmod-ip6tables_2.4.34-brcm-1_mipsel.ipk
http://downloads.openwrt.org/kamikaze/7.09/brcm-2.4/packages/ip6tables_1.3.7-1_mipsel.ipk

For some reason the ipkg in v24 won’t download from URLs, so I was forced to download them elsewhere and copy the packages in using scp. After installing these packages, lines 2 thru 4 in the startup config above will load appropriate kernel modules (there are other ip6tables modules you might also want to load).

Next, I added the following to my firewall commands:

Code:
export IP6TABLES_LIB_DIR=/jffs/usr/lib/iptables
PATH="$PATH":/jffs/usr/sbin
ip6tables -F
ip6tables -A FORWARD -p tcp -i he-ipv6 --syn -m multiport --dports ftp-data,ftp,ssh,smtp,http,https,ntp,domain -j ACCEPT
ip6tables -A FORWARD -p tcp -i he-ipv6 --syn -j DROP
ip6tables -A FORWARD -p udp -i he-ipv6 -m multiport --dports ntp,domain -j ACCEPT
ip6tables -A FORWARD -p udp -i he-ipv6 -j DROP


The first two lines set up the environment to run the ip6tables command. Next the tables are flushed, since this is not done automatically before calling the firewall script as it is with the IPv4 tables. My testing reveals that booting a router causes the firewall script to be run no less than four times! I’m guessing this might be because it is tied to the wanup condition. The remaining lines allow through certain TCP and UDP ports, reject all other ports, and ultimately let through all other protocols, such as ICMPv6. If you are more paranoid you could write more specific rules for other protocols.

What could be done to improve this and make IPv6 configuration easier? First of all, the necessary IPv6 firewall modules could be in a standard build. NEWD_nokaid isn’t small enough for any free JFFS space, but I believe that these few modules should fit (I also miss the ip6t_REJECT module, which is missing from the OpenWRT package). Next, it would be really nice to have busybox built with the ping6 command and the inet6 option to netstat, and to add the traceroute6 command. It’s really frustrating not having a ping6 command, and installing an alternate busybox from OpenWRT just for this is rather large. Finally, some well-integrated GUI configuration for IPv6, so that it doesn’t look like a second-class protocol, would be welcome.

If I get some time, I’ll create my own custom build with some of these issues fixed and release it if anyone is interested.

Overall, I’m happy to see it finally possible to make IPv6 work again in some form on a 4MB router, after the (apparently) failed promise to have it integrated before the v24 release. I understand there are space issues, but this is no excuse for omission from the mega build. I’ve always found it annoying that most external mention of DD-WRT has included IPv6 in the feature list because it’s supported in the ancient v23, but that reality doesn’t fit people’s expectations that it is also supported in current development.
SMF
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 13 Jan 2007
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2008 11:21    Post subject: Reply with quote
crushedhat,

If you would create a custom build I would be very interested. I'm running the last build with IPv6 v24 RC6 and am uncomfortable (given my skill level) repeating the steps you did so a custom build would greatly help me.

Thanks,
SMF
crushedhat
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Jul 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Fair Oaks, CA, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2008 11:12    Post subject: Reply with quote
SMF,

I got tired of my own kludged solution and decided to tackle building from source. Once I figured out the arcane build system (doesn’t anyone know how to construct Makefiles with proper dependencies anymore?), all went well and I now have a very nice custom build with lots of built-in IPv6 support. Everything I wanted (except GUI configuration) is now in there without a requirement for anything in /jffs. I still want to tweak and test a few things, and then I’ll post a binary version in a couple of days that you can try, closely followed by the set of source changes that hopefully the devs will see fit to integrate into the trunk.

I run a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54. If your hardware is similar enough I see no reason that my build won’t run on your router. However, please keep in mind that this is bleeding edge stuff (based on the latest SVN revision) and hasn’t had extensive testing like the official releases. I’ve had to do TFTP recovery several times (which is pretty trivial). Although I haven’t needed to yet, I’m prepared to use JTAG if necessary. If you don’t feel comfortable making JTAG work, then you have a slightly higher risk of bricking your router permanently.

Please tell me:
  1. What router hardware do you have?

  2. How do you (or intend to) connect to IPv6? Static tunnel (such as Hurricane Electric)? Dynamic tunnel (such as Freenet6)? Auto-config on local net (with other IPv6 router)?

  3. What do you want in the build? Do you need hotspots? KAID? CIFS? USB? VPN?
Infern0
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 21 Jul 2008
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2008 9:15    Post subject: Reply with quote
crushedhat wrote:

  1. What router hardware do you have?

  2. How do you (or intend to) connect to IPv6? Static tunnel (such as Hurricane Electric)? Dynamic tunnel (such as Freenet6)? Auto-config on local net (with other IPv6 router)?

  3. What do you want in the build? Do you need hotspots? KAID? CIFS? USB? VPN?

1. Asus WL-500W
2. Sixxs static tunnel
3. standard build will do

I used your way to make ipv6 work with a sixxs AYiYA tunnel however after some time the aiccu daemon stops working. So I now switched to a static tunnel, which I'm trying to get working.

Next to that I use siproxd for Voip, which is also working.
Infern0
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 21 Jul 2008
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 11:22    Post subject: Reply with quote
Any news on the firmware?

I got ipv6 working with the Hurricane tunnel. The sixxs ipv6 tunnel is no succes at the moment. I opened a ticket for that.

Next to the commands you gave I added some extra for me:
Code:

ip route del ::/0 dev he-ipv6
ip addr del 2001:470:xxx:xx::2/64 dev he-ipv6
ip link set he-ipv6 down
ip tunnel del he-ipv6 mode sit remote 216.66.84.46 local 84.xx.x.x0 ttl 255

Now is everything clean again.
[/code]
crushedhat
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Jul 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Fair Oaks, CA, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 5:47    Post subject: Enhanced firmware for IPv6 support Reply with quote
My original intent was to create a build for a router with 4MB flash that properly supported IPv6 and included OpenVPN, with a little bit of JFFS space for scripts and config files. Once I succeeded at this, I just couldn’t resist the urge to fix all the little issues that were bugging me, which turned into a week of serious hacking.

Changes in My Version
  • More fully support IPv6 in the router. When IPv6 is enabled in the GUI, the ipv6 kernel module and several IPv6 firewall modules are loaded automatically, and IPv6 packet forwarding is enabled. The radvd daemon is now started later, after the user initialization scripts have run.

  • Many busybox-based commands now support IPv6 including ping/ping6, telnet, telnetd, ifconfig, netstat, and route. Sadly, IPv6 code for traceroute has still not been ported to busybox.

  • Add a -q option to the nvram utility to output NVRAM data with shell commands and proper quoting. This output is suitable to run as a script which sets the variables. It is especially useful for variables with embedded newlines.

  • Fix ip6tables code so it will build and run, including a multi version with ip6tables-save and ip6tables-restore, and enable build of the appropriate kernel modules.

  • Add REJECT target for IPv6, based on a port of kernel 2.6 code. All ICMPv6 reject types work, but not (yet) TCP reset.

  • Add config option (CONFIG_ERROR_TEXT) to re-enable some program error text that was disabled to save space (currently in iptables, ip6tables, and dnsmasq). This assists testing when using these programs on the command line.

  • Modify web server to listen on IPv6 socket. Disabling Wireless GUI Access does not currently prevent access via IPv6.

  • Add config option (CONFIG_ANCHORFREE) to omit the AnchorFree (“My Ad Network”) code. This is off in my build.

  • Revert an apparent mistake, existing in recent SVN versions >= 9649, that opened a security hole.

  • Remove unnecessary config of dhcp-lease-max for dnsmasq, which prevented manual config options from adding additional DHCP ranges.

  • If LAN default gateway is set, advertise it as DHCP default route instead of the router’s own address. This is useful when the router has no WAN, behaving only as an access point, but still provides DHCP service to the LAN.

  • The nvram option reject_ports, when set to 1 (no GUI currently), actively rejects (rather than ignore by dropping the packets) IPv4 TCP connections and UDP packets targeted to the router itself for unknown ports. This is more “correct”, with the trade-off being that the router exposes its existence.

These changes are generally not user-visible, but are related to code and build system cleanup.
  • Symbolic links in firmware image filesystem were inconsistently absolute and relative. Make all links relative.

  • Some Makefile cleanup and dependency fixes. There’s much more of this to do.

  • Fix C const usage related to nvram functions. There’s much more of this to fix.

  • Mark for deletion many files resulting from build (especially platform-specific executables) that don’t belong in SVN. There are still many executables (pre-built for x86 Linux) for which there is no source in the build tree.

  • No longer delete SVN-managed directories during build, preventing SVN errors.

  • Remove build dependency on absolute paths /opt and /GruppenLW. Toolchains are referenced by symbolic links in the build tree.

  • rflow is compiled with the GCC version 3 compiler to avoid linkage errors. I have yet to determine why it won’t build with GCC 4.

  • Fix GUI submenu display logic so that different option combinations display properly.

  • Since my build requires changes that increase the size of the kernel and busybox, which may not be desirable for all builds, I’ve defined a new CONFIG_DIST type called std+ to enable these changes. I’ve also enabled these for the mega build.

  • New Makefile-based top-level build method (work-in-progress).

My build is based on the SVN revision 9991 which contains some new features compared to “stable” builds, but may also contain some new bugs.

What’s included in my build is similar to the std build plus the IPv6 extras and OpenVPN support (but not the Cisco VPN client, which is very large). Hotspots, AnchorFree, KAID, CIFS, MMC, OLSR, and languages other than English are not included. On my 4MB Buffalo I have 60k of JFFS space available.

My package contains two ways to run the firmware: the easy method, and the extremely easy method. The extremely easy method is simply a binary image that is installed in the normal way. The easy method is a script and set of patches that retrieves the relevant SVN sources and cross-compilers, applies the patches, and, in an appropriate Linux environment, executes an entire build from beginning to end with one command. After that, rebuilding after making changes can be accomplished without running the entire procedure. I’m working on reducing what is performed on rebuild, but this is not easy to get right.

Building From Source
  1. You must be using a version of Linux that will run the executables in the precompiled toolchains. I’m running Fedora 9 x64 with the “Development” installation package set. It is not obvious that you also need to add the compat-libstdc++-33 package and its dependencies.

  2. Download and extract my source package to an appropriate empty directory.

  3. To run the entire process, including SVN source and toolchain download, run download_and_build-crushedhat. Alternatively, you may wish to split the script into several manual steps. The SVN download is a selected set of parts required to build my version, but is still around 1.5 GB. If you have shell access to a Linux box on a fast net that is not your build machine on a slower net, you may wish to download and compress the sources on the fast net first (compressed, the SVN source are around 250 MB).

  4. Rename the resulting file svn/image/dd-wrt.v24.trx to an appropriate name with a .bin extension and upgrade your router with it.

  5. If you make changes to the router source, you can do a semi-quick rebuild using “make -f Makefile.crushedhat router image-build”.

Downloads

Download the firmware binary and source change packages from:

This version is old. See newer versions below.

http;//www.crushedhat.com/downloads/DD-WRT/dd-wrt.v24-9991_crushedhat_4MB.bin
http://www.crushedhat.com/downloads/DD-WRT/dd-wrt.v24-9991_crushedhat-src.tar.bz2

My version should run on at least the same set of hardware as Eko’s NEWD versions. However, I have only tested it on two routers, a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 and a Linksys WRT600N. Be prepared to recover if things don’t go well. If you were running a previous version, be sure to reset the NVRAM, as it seems the newer source uses different network port configuration which will cause the new code to fail booting old NVRAM settings.

I will encourage the developers to integrate my changes into the main source. I’d be happy to do this myself, but I assume that SVN commit access is not granted lightly. If you are a developer and are integrating my changes on my behalf, please credit me in the log.

Sample IPv6 Tunnel Configuration

Here’s a sample configuration for a static Hurricane Electric tunnel. Note how much simpler this is compared to my configuration based on Eko’s build, and no package installation is required. In the Administration/Commands startup script:

Code:
ip tunnel add he-ipv6 mode sit remote 72.52.104.74 ttl 64
ip link set he-ipv6 up
ip addr add 2001:470:1f00:0::2/64 dev he-ipv6
ip route add ::/0 dev he-ipv6
ip addr add 2001:470:1f01:0:200:00ff:fe00:0000/64 dev br0

In “Radvd config” on the Administration/Management panel:
Code:
interface br0 {
        AdvSendAdvert on;
        prefix 2001:470:1f01:0::/64
        {
                AdvOnLink on;
                AdvAutonomous on;
        };
}

In the Administration/Commands firewall script:
Code:
insmod ip6t_REJECT
ip6tables -F
ip6tables -A FORWARD -p tcp -i he-ipv6 --syn -m multiport --dports ftp-data,ftp,ssh,smtp,http,https,ntp,domain -j ACCEPT
ip6tables -A FORWARD -p tcp -i he-ipv6 --syn -j REJECT --reject-with adm-prohibited
ip6tables -A FORWARD -p udp -i he-ipv6 -m multiport --dports ntp,domain -j ACCEPT
ip6tables -A FORWARD -p udp -i he-ipv6 -j REJECT --reject-with adm-prohibited

Please see my previous post for more description of this config.

I want to thank all those that came before me that posted information and guides for building DD-WRT. My work is based on yours.

The next thing I’m working on is building a mega version to run on my spiffy new WRT600N. Expect more stuff included than previous mega builds. Also, I’m going to integrate the AICCU client utility, used for maintaining SixXS IPv6 tunnels using dynamic IPv4 addresses. I may try to add some GUI config for IPv6, making even the above startup scripts unnecessary.


Last edited by crushedhat on Mon Aug 04, 2008 19:47; edited 2 times in total
crushedhat
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Jul 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Fair Oaks, CA, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 5:50    Post subject: Reply with quote
Infern0 wrote:
Next to the commands you gave I added some extra for me:
Code:

ip route del ::/0 dev he-ipv6
ip addr del 2001:470:xxx:xx::2/64 dev he-ipv6
ip link set he-ipv6 down
ip tunnel del he-ipv6 mode sit remote 216.66.84.46 local 84.xx.x.x0 ttl 255



I really don’t understand. Why do you need to undo the configuration?
Infern0
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 21 Jul 2008
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 21:14    Post subject: Reply with quote
I will try your firmware surely looks very promising!

Why you want to shut down your tunnel, that is for testing purposes only.
Infern0
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 21 Jul 2008
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 19:53    Post subject: Reply with quote
Tested your version on a Asus WL500W looks ok! Everything works as it should!

I only use a different ipv6 startup script which includes logger so it gets in my syslog of my server.

Should I post it? It is based on the sixxs startup script.
crushedhat
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Jul 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Fair Oaks, CA, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 23:01    Post subject: Reply with quote
Here’s binaries of a new version: based on SVN rev. 10070 (post v24-sp1), includes traceroute6, AICCU client (for SixXS dynamic IPv6 tunnels), proper Linux clock handling, and a mega version for routers with 8MB flash (such as the Asus WL-500W). Tested on Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 and Linksys WRT600N. I’ll update the previous post later with more details, a sample SixXS tunnel config, and a source patch set.

http://www.crushedhat.com/downloads/DD-WRT/dd-wrt.v24-10070_crushedhat_4MB.bin
http://www.crushedhat.com/downloads/DD-WRT/dd-wrt.v24-10070_crushedhat_mega.bin
zph
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 10:21    Post subject: Reply with quote
crushedhat wrote:
Here’s binaries of a new version: based on SVN rev. 10070 (post v24-sp1), includes traceroute6, AICCU client (for SixXS dynamic IPv6 tunnels), proper Linux clock handling, and a mega version for routers with 8MB flash (such as the Asus WL-500W). Tested on Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 and Linksys WRT600N. I’ll update the previous post later with more details, a sample SixXS tunnel config, and a source patch set.

http://www.crushedhat.com/downloads/DD-WRT/dd-wrt.v24-10070_crushedhat_4MB.bin
http://www.crushedhat.com/downloads/DD-WRT/dd-wrt.v24-10070_crushedhat_mega.bin


As I was in the process of moving from Static tunnel to AYiYA, I considered several of the proposed solutions, even jumping back to OpenWRT. I'm glad I found your post and dared trying your "custom" build. This is how DD-WRT should be in v24, no KAID or Hotspot, freeing space for plenty of IPv6 capabilities; all wrapped in a lovely management package. :D

Crushedhat, you're my hero of the day! (tm)
crushedhat
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 04 Jul 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Fair Oaks, CA, USA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 17:53    Post subject: Reply with quote
zph wrote:
As I was in the process of moving from Static tunnel to AYiYA, I considered several of the proposed solutions, even jumping back to OpenWRT.

Why move from static to AYIYA? Static is the best choice, if you have a static IP for your router. Next best is AICCU, which supports a dynamic endpoint but still runs efficiently over protocol 41. AYIYA, IMHO, is a lazy “solution” for people running Windows boxes behind NATs or restrictive firewalls, who only want simple IPv6 connectivity for the one machine; it’s not suitable or necessary on a gateway router with direct access to the WAN, that is, outside of the NAT and firewall. I’m sure there are cases of people with restrictive ISPs that block IP protocol 41 and require AYIYA with it’s high-overhead protocol running on top of UDP, but I suspect these are in the minority. (In fact, I’m currently fighting a colocation ISP right now that cluelessly blocks protocol 41, but I refuse to run AYIYA to get around this.)

zph wrote:
This is how DD-WRT should be in v24, no KAID or Hotspot, freeing space for plenty of IPv6 capabilities; all wrapped in a lovely management package. :D

Crushedhat, you’re my hero of the day! (tm)

Thanks for the kudos! I agree that this should be a more common configuration. Eko’s been releasing these types of builds for a while now, but somehow the versions without hotspots don’t make it into general release. I’ve actually trimmed a few more things that are likely seldom used, such as AnchorFree ("My Ad Network"), which I actually find a bit offensive, and olsrd, which isn’t useful unless you’re setting up or joining a wide-area mesh network.

My next version’s coming very soon, with full GUI support and online help. I’m just working through one bug apparently due to a race condition during service startup/shutdown.
zph
DD-WRT Novice


Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2008 21:35    Post subject: Reply with quote
crushedhat wrote:
zph wrote:
As I was in the process of moving from Static tunnel to AYiYA, I considered several of the proposed solutions, even jumping back to OpenWRT.

Why move from static to AYIYA? Static is the best choice, if you have a static IP for your router. Next best is AICCU, [...]


oops, got a bit carried away there (had just read an article on AYiYA) - obivously ment AICCU Embarassed. My connection is semi-static; over the last two years, I've had 3-4 different IP's assigned to my IPv6 router. Problem is, the change came totally unprovoked, so I decided to change to a solution that allowed for less manual intervention.

crushedhat wrote:
zph wrote:
...Crushedhat, you’re my hero of the day! (tm)

Thanks for the kudos! I agree that this should be a more common configuration.
[...]
My next version’s coming very soon, with full GUI support and online help. I’m just working through one bug apparently due to a race condition during service startup/shutdown.

Looking forward to it =)
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